Useful scripts for macOS

Getting Started

You might find these articles useful

One of the advantages with scripts is the fact that you can easily automate many tasks. Here is an article that walks you through that process.

If you come across a situation where you want to perform a set of tasks on multiple computers then scripts come in very handy.

I will be providing the Shell Script version of the task. Feel free to make changes to the scripts as required. I will try to provide an AppleScript version of the tasks a little later.

This is not the only way to implement the scripts. There may be multiple approaches towards achieving the same result. You will have to explore and examine the correct approach.

This is not a comprehensive list. The scripts should give you some ideas and act as a useful reference when you are creating your own scripts.

I have tested these scripts on macOS Catalina 10.15

Download

You can download all the scripts from here.

Script CategoryPage Number
Settings and Accounts1
Security2
Data3
Information Collection4
File System5

Disclaimer

The Software Is Provided “As Is”, Without Warranty Of Any Kind, Express Or Implied, Including But Not Limited To The Warranties Of Merchantability, Fitness For A Particular Purpose And Noninfringement. In No Event Shall The Authors Or Copyright Holders Be Liable For Any Claim, Damages Or Other Liability, Whether In An Action Of Contract, Tort Or Otherwise, Arising From, Out Of Or In Connection With The Software Or The Use Or Other Dealings In The Software.


WARNING

Please try these scripts on a test computer. Some of the scripts do make changes to the system. Always test before using these scripts.

Automation on the Mac

Automating tasks on the Mac is very useful for a wide variety of reasons. In this article we are going to look at the different technologies available for automating tasks.

TOOLS

Automator

The simplest way of achieving automation. Automator which is a built in application allows you to create task workflows by simply dragging in a set of predefined routines into a specified sequence. Let us explore how it works by creating a watermarking print plugin

Let us look at how we can create a print plugin that automatically adds a watermark to the pdf file.

  1. First get hold of an image that you will use as a watermark.
  2. Open Automator.
  3. Click on “New Document”
  4. Choose Print Plugin as the type of task to createScreen Shot 2018-03-21 at 11.58.26 AM
  5. From the left hand side drag the “Watermark PDF Documents” option. You will be able to locate this from the PDF library on the extreme right.1
  6. Add the image that will be used as a watermark. Customise the settings to your desired level. You may have to use trial and error till you get the desired output.
  7. Similarly drag the Move finder Items to the right. You will be able to locate this from the Files & Folders library.2
  8. Save the task as WatermarkCreator.
  9. Open a text file.
  10. Select File > Print
  11. Click on the PDF drop down in the print dialog.3.4
  12. Select the newly created task.
    3
  13. You have now successfully setup your own watermark creator.

Shell Scripting

For those coming from a Linux/Unix background this might be a familiar option. Very often users need to run a series of terminal commands repeatedly. While it is not difficult to do this, wouldn’t it be nice if we could write all the commands in a single file? Shell Scripts help users do just that.

To create a shell script:

  1. Open TextEdit
  2. Write the following code in there (We will write code to create a series of files and folders in our home folder for a user called admin):
    #! /bin/sh
    cd /Users/admin/
    if [ -d "/Users/admin/Applications/" ]; then
    echo "Applications Folder Exists"
    else
    mkdir Applications
    fi
    if [ -d "/Users/admin/Sites/" ]; then
    echo "Sites Folder Exists"
    else
    mkdir Sites
    fi
    if [ -d "/Users/admin/Developer/" ]; then
    echo "Developer Folder Exists"
    else
    mkdir Developer
    fi
    cd Developer
    if [ -d "/Users/admin/Developer/iOSProjects/" ]; then
    echo "iOSProjects Folder Exists"
    else
    mkdir iOSProjects
    fi
    if [ -d "/Users/admin/Developer/macOSProjects/" ]; then
    echo "macOSProjects Folder Exists"
    else
    mkdir macOSProjects
    fi
    
  3. Save the file with the name FolderCreator on the Desktop.
  4. Open the Terminal Application
  5. Let us make the script executable. To do that, run the commands:
    cd ~/Desktop
    chmod 777 FolderCreator
    
  6. Now run the command:
    ./FolderCreator

You have now easily created your own shell script. For more information about terminal commands you can read the following articles: Terminal Commands for OS X – BasicTerminal Commands for OS X – Part 2Terminal Commands – Part 3, & Configuring/Troubleshooting OS X Using Command Line

AppleScript

AppleScript is Apple’s proprietary scripting technology. It comes bundled as a part of macOS. To create AppleScript tasks we need to use the built in AppleScript editor.

Here is an example of a small AppleScript

tell application “Finder” to set the view for all Finder Windows as column view
tell application “Finder” to close every Finder Window
tell application “Safari”
open location “<a href="http://www.arunpatwardhan.com">http://www.arunpatwardhan.com</a>
open location “<a href="http://www.amaranthine.in/feedback">http://www.amaranthine.in/feedback</a>
open location “<a href="http://www.amaranthine.in/gallery">http://www.amaranthine.in/gallery</a>
end tell

Copy that block of commands in your AppleScript editor and see what comes up.

There are many more things that can be done with AppleScript. You can have popup windows asking users for commands, turn off the computer. Change the settings for different parts of the OS and for different applications. All this with commands written in a single file. All the user has to do is double click the file.

For more information about AppleScript visit Apple’s Developer site.

Launch Agents, Launch Daemons

NOTE: Scheduling Launch Agents/Launch Daemons improperly may leave your computer in an unusable state. Always test this on a computer that does not contain important data. If you are unsure, please consult someone with knowledge of the same before proceeding ahead.

Launch Agents/Launch Daemons allow you to schedule tasks which are to be performed at intervals. You can also use them to ensure that tasks are kept running and that the user does not have the possibility to quit them. To setup a launch daemon:

  1. First create a Plist file that looks like the one below. I have created a script called echoer and placed it in the /Users/admin/Applications folder where admin is the user.Screen Shot 2018-03-22 at 10.34.18 AM
  2. Place the file in the ~/Library/LaunchAgents folder. Name it in.amaranthine.demod.plist
  3. Run the command in terminal to load the Launch Agent.
    launchctl load ~/Library/LaunchAgent/in.amaranthine.demod.plist

That’s it you have just setup a simple launch agent which will ensure that your script runs every 6 seconds.

For more information or to create detailed Launch Agents/Launch Daemons visit:Creating Launch Agents & Launch Daemons

Login Items

An easy way to automatically load, Applications/Files/Folder, as soon as well login is to use Login Items. This is very easy to do.

  1. Open System Preferences > Users & Groups
  2. Switch to the Login Items tab.IMG_1560
  3. Click on the ‘+’ sign at the bottom to add new Applications. Let’s add Maps so that it launches as soon as we login. You should see it appear in the list.IMG_1561

That’s it. You have setup login items. You can repeat this process for as many applications as you wish.

Others

PHP, Perl, Python, Javascript, Swift allow you to create custom automated tasks and routines. These require knowledge of programming.

Choosing the right approach

Which one to choose depends on a lot of factors but we can break it down to 2:

  • You are a technically qualified person and understand things like programming, scripting and command line
  • You are an end user working either at home or in office.

End User

If you are an End user then you should really stick to Automator and Login Items. These are the ones that are the easiest to implement and least likely to cause any issues. You could venture and explore other options if you have a good understanding of them. Or you can ask the IT or Tech Support teams to help you with scripting and other technologies.

Tech Support or IT Person

Any of the tools mentioned above can be used by you. Make sure that you have a good command over the tools and are able to troubleshoot issues arising out of their usage.

Note: The programs/applications/tools and languages mentioned in this article may not cover all the available options. Also, anyone who uses or implements the items mentioned in the article does so at their own risk. The author does not take responsibility for any loss or damage that may arise from the use of the programs/applications/tools and languages mentioned above.

 

Programming Style Guide: Code Refactoring

One of the key attributes towards code that is readable and easy on the eyes is code that is split into appropriately sized pieces. Code refactoring is does exactly that. It is very easy to write a program as one big piece of code. Of course, any program that grows becomes increasingly complicated and highly inefficient. If not controlled, it will soon reach a point where it is highly unreadable, extremely difficult to maintain & filled with bugs. Not to mention that it is inefficient too.

Refactoring code and breaking it down into smaller reusable chunks is the key. The objective is:

  1. To make code easier to read
  2. To make reusable components so that we can save on duplication of code. This will reduce the code count and make sure that any changes to the reused code are available everywhere.
  3. To lend a structure to the application. Tasks now have their own space.
  4. Build scalable and maintainable code.
  5. Build bug free code.

Let us look at an example.

Screen Shot 2017-10-16 at 11.26.26 AM

Bad Code

This code is clearly written poorly. Its difficult to read. There aren’t good whitespaces. No consistency. Even the naming conventions are poor.

The fix would be :

  • Break it down into different functions
  • Separate tasks into their own files
  • Name the different elements of the code properly.

This is how the code looks now. It has been broken down into different files.

main.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include "MathOperations.hpp"
#include "Choices.hpp"

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
     float number1           = 0.0;
     float number2           = 0.0;
     Choices selectedOption  = CLEAR;
     float answer            = 0;
     float integralAnswer    = 0;

     while(EXIT != selectedOption)
     {
          //Welcome message
          std::cout<<"Welcome to Calculator Program"<<std::endl;
          std::cout<<"Choose between the following options"<<std::endl;
          std::cout<<"1. Add\n2. Subtract\n3. Multiply\n4. Divide\n5. Remainder\n6. Percentage"<<std::endl;

          //User choice
          std::cout<<"Choice: ";                               std::cin>>selectedOption;

          //Chance to enter first number
          std::cout<<"Number 1: ";                               std::cin>>number1;

          //Chance to enter second number
          std::cout<<"Number 2: ";                               std::cin>>number2;

          switch (selectedOption)
          {
               case ADDITION:
                    answer = addition(number1, number2);
                    std::cout<<"The addition of "<<number1<<" & "<<number2<<" = "<<answer<<std::endl;
                    break;
               case SUBTRACTION:
                    answer = subtraction(number1, number2);
                    std::cout<<"The subtraction of "<<number1<<" & "<<number2<<" = "<<answer<<std::endl;
                    break;
               case MULTIPLICATION:
                    answer = multiplication(number1, number2);
                    std::cout<<"The multiplication of "<<number1<<" & "<<number2<<" = "<<answer<<std::endl;
                    break;
               case DIVISION:
                    answer = division(number1, number2);
                    std::cout<<"The division of "<<number1<<" & "<<number2<<" = "<<answer<<std::endl;
                    break;
               case REMAINDER:
                    integralAnswer = remainder((int)number1, (int)number2);
                    std::cout<<"The remainder of "<<number1<<" divided by "<<number2<<" = "<<integralAnswer<<std::endl;
                    break;
               case PERCENTAGE:
                    answer = percentage(number1, number2);
                    std::cout<<"The percentage of "<<number1<<" out of "<<number2<<" = "<<answer<<span 				data-mce-type="bookmark" 				id="mce_SELREST_start" 				data-mce-style="overflow:hidden;line-height:0" 				style="overflow:hidden;line-height:0" 			></span><std::endl;
                    break;
               default:
                    break;
          }
     }
     return 0;
}

Choices.hpp

#ifndef Choices_hpp
#define Choices_hpp

#include <stdio.h>
#include <iostream>

enum Choices : unsigned short int { ADDITION = 1, SUBTRACTION, MULTIPLICATION, DIVISION, REMAINDER, PERCENTAGE, CLEAR, EXIT};

typedef enum Choices Choices;

std::istream& operator >>(std::istream &is, Choices& enumVar);

#endif

Choices.cpp

#include "Choices.hpp"

std::istream& operator >>(std::istream &is, Choices& enumVar)
{
    unsigned short int intVal;
    is>>intVal;
    switch (intVal) {
        case 1:
            enumVar = ADDITION;
            break;
        case 2:
            enumVar = SUBTRACTION;
            break;
        case 3:
            enumVar = MULTIPLICATION;
            break;
        case 4:
            enumVar = DIVISION;
            break;
        case 5:
            enumVar = REMAINDER;
            break;
        case 6:
            enumVar = PERCENTAGE;
            break;
        default:
            enumVar = EXIT;
            break;
    }
    return is;
}

MathOperations.hpp

#ifndef MathOperations_hpp
#define MathOperations_hpp

#include <stdio.h>

//Addition
float addition(float number1, float number2);

//Subtraction
float subtraction(float number1, float number2);

//Multiplication
float multiplication(   float number1, float number2);

//Division
float division(float number1, float number2);

//Remainder
int remainder(int number1, int number2);

//Percentage
float percentage(float number1, float number2);

#endif

MathOperations.cpp

#include "MathOperations.hpp"

//Addition
float addition(float number1, float number2)
{
    return number1 + number2;
}

//Subtraction
float subtraction(float number1, float number2)
{
    return number1 - number2;
}

//Multiplication
float multiplication(   float number1, float number2)
{
    return number2 * number1;
}

//Division
float division(float number1, float number2)
{
    if (number2 > 0) {
        return number1 / number2;
    }
    return 0.0;
}

//Remainder
int remainder(int number1, int number2)
{
    return number1 % number2;
}

//Percentage
float percentage(float number1, float number2)
{
    if (number2 > 0) {
        return (number1 / number2) * 100.0;
    }
    return 0.0;
}

Let us look at how this looks for Swift.
main.swift

import Foundation

var number1 : Float             = 0.0
var number2 : Float             = 0.0
var selectedOption : Choices    = Choices.CLEAR
var answer : Float              = 0.0
var integralAnswer : Int        = 0

func readNumbers(One firstNumber : inout Float, Two secondNumber : inout Float)
{
     //Chance to enter first number
     print("Number 1: \n")
     firstNumber = Choices.inputNumbers()

     //Chance to enter second number
     print("Number 2: \n")
     secondNumber = Choices.inputNumbers()
}

while(Choices.EXIT != selectedOption)
{
     //Welcome message
     print("Welcome to Calculator Program")
     print("Choose between the following options")
     print("1. Add\n2. Subtract\n3. Multiply\n4. Divide\n5. Remainder\n6. Percentage")

     //User choice
     print("Choice: \n")
     selectedOption = Choices.inputChoices()
     switch (selectedOption)
     {
          case Choices.ADDITION:
               readNumbers(One: &number1, Two: &number2)
               answer = addition_of(_value: number1, with_value: number2)
               print("The addition of \(number1) & \(number2) = \(answer)")
               break
          case Choices.SUBTRACTION:
               readNumbers(One: &number1, Two: &number2)
               answer = subtraction_of(_value: number1, from_value: number2)
               print("The subtraction of \(number1) & \(number2) = \(answer)")
               break
          case Choices.MULTIPLICATION:
               readNumbers(One: &number1, Two: &number2)
               answer = multiplication_of(_value: number1, with_value: number2)
               print("The multiplication of \(number1) & \(number2) = \(answer)")
               break
          case Choices.DIVISION:
               readNumbers(One: &number1, Two: &number2)
               answer = division_of(_value: number1, by_value: number2)
               print("The division of \(number1) & \(number2) = \(answer)")
               break
          case Choices.REMAINDER:
               readNumbers(One: &number1, Two: &number2)
               integralAnswer = remainder_of(_value: Int(exactly:number1)!, <span 				data-mce-type="bookmark" 				id="mce_SELREST_start" 				data-mce-style="overflow:hidden;line-height:0" 				style="overflow:hidden;line-height:0" 			></span>divided_by_value: Int(exactly: number2)!)
               print("The remainder of \(number1) divided by \(number2) = \(integralAnswer)")
               break
          case Choices.PERCENTAGE:
               readNumbers(One: &number1, Two: &number2)
               answer = percentage_of(_value: number1, with_respect_to_value: number2)
               print("The percentage of \(number1) out of \(number2) = \(answer)")
               break
          default:
               selectedOption = .EXIT
               break
     }
}

Choices.swift

import Foundation

enum Choices { case ADDITION, SUBTRACTION, MULTIPLICATION, DIVISION, REMAINDER, PERCENTAGE, CLEAR, EXIT}

//CLI Reading Capability
extension Choices
{
    static func inputChoices() -> Choices
    {
        let ip : String? = readLine()
        let choice : String = String(ip!)

        switch choice {
        case "1":
            return .ADDITION
        case "2":
            return .SUBTRACTION
        case "3":
            return .MULTIPLICATION
        case "4":
            return .DIVISION
        case "5":
            return .REMAINDER
        case "6":
            return .PERCENTAGE
        default:
            return .EXIT
        }
    }

    static func inputNumbers() -> Float
    {
        let ip : String? = readLine()

        let numberFormatter = NumberFormatter()
        let number = numberFormatter.number(from: ip!)

        let num : Float? = number?.floatValue
        return num!
    }
}

MathOperations.swift

import Foundation

//Addition
func addition_of(_value number1 : Float, with_value number2 : Float) -> Float
{
    return number1 + number2;
}

//Subtraction
func subtraction_of(_value number2 : Float, from_value number1 : Float) -> Float
{
    return number1 - number2;
}

//Multiplication
func multiplication_of(_value number1 : Float, with_value number2 : Float) -> Float
{
    return number2 * number1;
}

//Division
func division_of(_value number1 : Float, by_value number2 : Float) -> Float
{
    if (number2 > 0) {
        return number1 / number2;
    }
    return 0.0;
}

//Remainder
func remainder_of(_value number1 : Int, divided_by_value number2 : Int) -> Int
{
    return number1 % number2;
}

//Percentage
func percentage_of(_value number1 : Float, with_respect_to_value number2 : Float) -> Float
{
    if (number2 > 0) {
        return (number1 / number2) * 100.0;
    }
    return 0.0;
}

Discussion on Swift Extensions

As we can see that most of the code in Swift is very similar to C++. Most of the differences are basic syntactic differences. However, there is 1 feature of Swift that greatly aids code refactoring that I would like to talk about, Extensions.

Extensions allow us to add new functionality to the existing type. As the name says the type is extended. This allows us to add changes to a type in a consistent & clearly demarcated way. Developers can now neatly separate newly added components. This greatly helps in understanding the evolution of types.

“This is often referred to as versioning.”

Extensions can be used in the following ways to implement code refactoring:

  • Different sections of a type reside in their own extensions
  • Changes made to a type are made by keeping them in their own extensions
  • Step by step build up of code is done by representing each step as an independent extension. This gives clarity on how a certain end result was achieved.

Conclusion

As we can see from the sample code above (for both C++ & Swift) the program is much more readable. Code is carefully compartmentalised. Its a lot easier to read. It is a lot easier to scale too.

The reader may point out that the amount of code to achieve the same result is significantly higher, that however is a small price to pay in the long run. The biggest advantage is the scalability & the ease with which it can be done. Simply breaking code down into separate files & functions makes a huge difference. Here are some other benefits:

  • Individual files can be modified. This means one can now have a team working on different parts of the code.
  • Code is less cluttered. Changes are now spread across files & are easier to track.

We will now see how we can further improve this code in upcoming articles.

Programming Style Guide: Naming Conventions

Today we are going to look at Naming conventions you can follow while writing code.

Naming conventions lay down the basic rules for naming different elements in your code. The objectives are simple:

  • Make the element easy to read
  • Should be self explanatory
  • Should contain information in a compact and concise manner.

Ideally a well named variable or function should not need a comment to explain what it is for.

With the above objectives in mind let us look at some of the naming conventions that can be followed. The examples are from the Swift & C++ programming languages.

Naming Conventions

Camel Case Names

In camel case naming convention the entire name of the element is constructed by forming a sentence joined into a single word. So for example if we have a variable for keeping track of the price of oil in US dollars then the variable name might be priceOfOilUSD.

Here are some examples of naming conventions with the camel case.

SWIFT

var priceOfOil : Float = 23.49

C++

float priceOfOil = 3.45;
class PersonInfo
{

};

Underscore Separated Names

In the underscore separated naming convention the entire name of the element is constructed by forming a sentence joined together with the help of underscores in-between them. So if we take the example of the variable keeping track of the price of oil in US dollars the the variable name might be price_of_oil_usd.

Swift

var price_of_oil : Float = 45.71

C++

float price_of_oil = 99.87;

void print_value_of_pi()
{
     //print something
}

Names with type information

A naming convention that is quite popular is the one that mixes the previous 2 naming conventions, with the underscore used to separate the type description in the prefix. So if we take the example of the variable keeping track of the price of oil in US dollars then the variable name might be f_priceOfOil or float_priceOfOil. Either of the design styles work. The prefix is popularly abbreviated and you can create your own rules for abbreviating the type description.

This style is often referred to as the Hungarian notation. The additional information that is provided as a part of the prefix can be:

  • Whether the variable is a pointer
  • Whether the variable is an object
  • The scope of the variable
  • Type size
  • Whether the data can vary or is a constant

Swift

var f_priceOfOil : Float = 0.0

C++

float f_priceOfOil = 22.3;
int *ptr_memmoryBuffer = NULL; //ptr indicates variable is a pointer

Naming Rules

There are some rules that are typically followed while designing names for variables and  functions. Like the conventions themselves the rules are not binding but they are very useful an give the added punch that naming conventions provide.

  1. Variable names always start in lower case.
  2. Type names always start in upper case.
  3. The naming conventions is consistently applied through all the projects
  4. Names should be kept as small as possible without sacrificing on the description

Naming Strategies

As far as strategies are concerned there are multiple approaches that one can follow. Here are some potential strategies.

  • Follow one naming convention for variables and another convention for functions.
  • Let constants be all upper case
  • Prefix types with your companies initials.

Summary

The above illustrate just some of the naming conventions that can be followed. By no means are they comprehensive or complete. Also it is not necessarily true that everyone follows the above naming conventions. You may find that many software development firms have their own unique naming convention. This article should give you an an idea about naming conventions. Feel free to share some naming conventions that you have come across.